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Building a Sustainable Condo Today Involves Designing for the Future

There’s no denying the effects climate change is having on new homes in Surrey. Severe weather systems are becoming more common with violentstorms, harsh droughts and raging wildfires threatening the environment and community.

To lower the industry’s carbon footprint today and in the future, developers in Surrey are adopting construction methods that are more sustainable and ecofriendly. Today’s designs for new homes in Surrey considers the current and future climate and weather so buildings are made to withstand severe storms while using less energy and creating less waste.

Surrey is a thriving city that is located between the Fraser River and US border. This vibrant and growing city with a population of more than 603,000 is leading the way in innovative housing designs to reduce pollution and lower the city’s carbon footprint so future generations can continue to enjoy everything this naturally beautiful area has to offer.

Surrey is leading the way in its sustainable housing development.Construction designs for new condos in Surrey are planned so there are less carbon gas emissions and no risk of depleting natural resources like energy, water, wood, and other raw materialsinnew homes.

Today’s innovative designs for a better future include:

Using sustainable materials

Sustainable materials are natural resources that can be easily replenished and reused so there is less impact to the environment. Wood planks and mass timberare an example of sustainable materials.

Not only can wood be grown so there is less risk of depleting this natural resource, but it is also one of the most versatile building materials. Wooden building products can be used in many areas of home building. Unused pieces are recyclable and reusable so there is less waste or carbon emissions.

Sustainable materials also require less maintenance and replacement so there is less waste in the short and long term.

Creating Passive Designs

Passive designs in new homes in Surrey maximize natural energy sources to create natural temperature regulation, water irrigation, light and air quality in a home. Using solar panels or strategically installing windows to maximize natural light and heat is an example of passive home designs.

Using passive home design plans in buildings lowers the need to purchase energy so current and future carbon emissions are less.

Designing Homes to Minimize Waste

Construction material waste is a major contributor to carbon emissions. Using sustainable materials and planning your home design before building eliminates a lot of waste.

Materials in today’s new condo construction uses materials that can be reused, resold, repurposed or recycled so less construction materials end up in landfills.

Building on Existing Infrastructure

Building new homes on existing streets not only reduces the cost and carbon footprint butreusing what already exists doesn’t further deplete natural habitats. Building new housing developments in areas where streets, sewage lines, and electrical infrastructure is already established is a highly efficient and eco-friendly way to replace older homes and empty lots into affordable and sustainable housing.

Energy Efficient Infrastructure

Using energy efficient infrastructure not only reduces the carbon footprint during the initial building stage, but it has long lasting effects on the future and environment as well.

Designing new condos in Surrey with natural lighting and irrigation systems, energy efficient fixtures like appliances, tankless water heating units, solar energy panels and geothermal heating systems maximizes energy efficiency and lowers carbon emissions.

As the population continues to grow, Surrey is leading the way in newhome designs for a better future. Through innovative and eco-friendly planning in new housing development projects, Surrey’s construction industry is reducing its carbon footprint in new condo buildings so current and future generations can enjoy a healthy home and combat climate change.

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